Download Terrestrial fishing: the history and development of the by Ed Koch PDF

By Ed Koch

Research a wealth of data at the patterns-how they took place, the way to tie them, and most significantly, easy methods to use them to take trout.

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Extra info for Terrestrial fishing: the history and development of the jassid, beetle, cricket, hopper, ant, and inchworm on Pennsylvania's legendary Letort

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Had we only taken movies, they would be priceless today. A few were able to catch trout and really understand what was taking place along those waters. Those few would spend hours talking with the regulars about the trout, their feeding habits, the water, casting techniques, patterns, and the newfound challenge of the terrestrials. As I mentioned earlier, many patterns were tied and tried: ring-neck rooster feathers, mallard breast feathers, grouse feathers, quail feathersanything that could be made to give the shape of the Japanese Beetle.

In Cotton's immortal essay on "How to angle for trout or grayling in a clear stream," published as part of the 1676 edition of Walton's Compleat Angler, he recommended several terrestrial imitations. Among the twelve flies he recommended for June were a flying ant, a green grasshopper, and a small dun grasshopper. There were others recommended for that month that may also have been imitations of non-aquatic insects. Many writers since then have included a few terrestrials in their list of flies: ants, grasshoppers, beetles, and an assortment of what some of them called pismires all got some attention.

There were some huge buttonwood trees right at the dam that were full of beetles. On numerous occasions this stretch provided me with hours of undisturbed fishing with the new beetle patterns. One Sunday morning I went down, sat on the bench, and watched the water. There must have been a dozen-and-a-half trout rising in an area of less than seventy-five yards, all under the overhanging branches of the buttonwoods. Taking one of the cliped-deer-hair beetles in a size # 14, I tied it to a 6X tippet and walked down to the edge of the bank, over the wall, and into the water.

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